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Kelseya uniflora sketch - mnps logo           Kelseya, Our Quarterly Newsletter

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MNPS Members may receive the Kelseya newsletter either in digital form via Email or as a printed, hardcopy version via regular mail.  Members who need to report a change in a physical or email address to receive MNPS correspondence should notify our membership chair, Cathie Jean, by Email or by sending a note to MNPS Membership, P.O. Box 8783, Missoula MT 59802. Not a member? Click to Join or Renew Membership and review the many good reasons you ought to join, including receiving immediate access to our valuable newsletter. Joining the Montana Native Plant Society is inexpensive and convenient, and you may join online or by regular mail.

As of July 2015, the Montana Native Plant Society policy is to publish the preceding issue of Kelseya on the website as soon as the next issue comes out (i.e., the Summer issue will be on the website as soon as the Fall issue comes out, etc.). If  you seek an earlier issue that is not on this page, it will be in the Kelseya Archive.


Current Issue (available on web shortly after the next issue is mailed) - V 31 1, Fall 2017. Catherine Cain tells about the challenges and rewards for the Calypso Chapter's median garden in Dillon, in "Reflections on Developing an Urban Native Plant Garden; in "On the Edge," Libby Knotts reviews the successful annual meeting held south of Lambert in June; this year's "Exploding Battery Hike" to the Cody Lake Fen and nearby areas is described by Jon Reny; in her "President's Platform" essay, new Society President, Gretchen Rupp, sets a theme for bolstering Society Membership, especially the need to continue to attract younger members; in "Cushion Plants: Community Status Report," Peter Lesica describes recent results from observations of permanent plots established cooperatively between the Missoula Parks and Recreation Department and the Clark Fork Chapter in 2007 to monitor the condition of native cushion plant communities found there; Peter Lesica also reports on "A Lifetime of Achievement: Brian Martin Receives 2017 Award"; the issue also includes a review of Montana's Pioneer Botanists by Patricia Holmgren and A Window into the Steppes by Madeline Mazurski; and a reflection on the life of Jerry DeSanto, 1928-2017 that appeared in the Hungry Horse News on July 26, 2017 is reprinted in this issue along with a personal remembrance of gratitude to Jerry by MNPS board secretary, Rachel Potter.


Recent Issues - V 30 4, Summer 2017. In, "Beautiful Nuisance: Yellowflag Iris," Monica Pokorny, Jim Jacobs, and Jane Mangold describe this invasive wetland weed and discuss possible control measures; Gretchen Rupp reports on field trips taken by Valley of Flowers members to private lands conserved by the Montana Land Reliance and the interesting species observed there; Peter Lesica reviews, "Thirty Years of Native Plant Conservation," efforts undertaken by the Montana Native Plant Society; and, as always, the newsletter includes other chapter news and events and some inspiring words from our outgoing President, Kathy Settevendemie.

V 30 3, Spring 2017. This edition's opening article is a Small Grant Report by Andrea Pipp, Botanist with the Montana Natural Heritage Program entitled, "Exploring Mosses and Lichens in Musselshell County. The article details how the author assembled an impressive team of experts to document the populations of mosses, liverworts, and lichens on the Milton Ranch in Montana's Musselshell County. The article describes the 40-year Milton Ranch program to foster biodiversity one their land and how the cataloging of these species adds greatly to the understanding of this part of the ecosystem and increases scientific knowledge for both the ranch and central Montana prairie country; Betty Kuropat of the Small Grants Committee documents the 4 awards for 2017; an upcoming book, Montana's Pioneer Botanists: Exploring the Mountains and Prairies edited by Rachel Potter and Peter Lesica is announced; in "Sagebrush Talk," Peter Lesica reports on recent research into protective chemical communication in sagebrush populations; a new book by Cathy L. Cripps, Vera S. Evenson, and Michael Kuo, The Essential guide to Rocky Mountain Mushrooms by Habitat, is reviewed by Frank Dugan, USDA-ARS Plant Introduction at Washington State University; and the issue also includes a great deal of timely news of the Society and Chapters.

V 30 2, Winter 2017. A 2016 Small Grant Report by Lisa Bickell of the Montana Natural History Center describes the Nature Adventure Garden built with the financial assistance of the Montana Native Plant Society; in a Conservation Update, PeterLesica describes the work of a coalition of Western Native Plant Societies to encourage the USDA Agricultural Research Service to develop native solutions for grassland restoration; a reprint article discusses, "The Redeeming Value of Weeds"; Rita Braun reviews a "New Glacier Field Guide," Trees and Flowering Shrubs of Glacier National Park by MNPS members Shannon Kimball and Peter Lesica; and a review of Consider the Seed by Ellen Kehlmann of the Washington Native Plant Society is reprinted from the Douglasia; another reprint – this time from the Montana Natural History Center's "Field Notes" series is "Gotta Like Those Lichens" by Kevin Murray of the University of Montana; and the Society and Chapter News of note.

V 30 1, Fall 2016. Western At-Large representative Jon Reny reports on another Fabulous Field Trip in the "Exploding Car Battery" series of hikes, this one to Geiger Lakes; Annual Meeting news includes articles on the Mount Haggin Extavaganza, Outstanding Service Award to Dave Hanna, and 2016 election results; Steve and Karen Shelly report on an extra field trip at the Annual Meeting to the Cattle Gulch Research Natural Area; Rachel Potter introduces an appreciation of University of Washington Botany Professor and Washington Native Plant Society founder Arthur Kruckenberg written by Dick Olmstead of UW; Small Grants Reports include, "A Place for Buzzing Minds," by Trinity Pierce of the Montana Audubon Center and "Pollination and Wildfire," by Michael Simanonok, PhD candidate, Department of Ecology, Montana State University; Gretchen Rupp describes a "Plant Foray out of Montana" into Yellowstone Park with Park botanist Heidi Anderson; Mark Shiltz and Clare Beelman submitted a report, "Small But Important," about a visit to a water howellia site including information about the blooming biology of the plant; and Peter Lesica describes a range of "Sticky Plants" that can be found in Montana. There is also the normal share of Society news to be found. 

V 29 4, Summer 2016. Kelseya editor, Caroline Kurtz, has chosen selections from a natural history piece on Botanical Natural History from "Dakota Flora: A Seasonal Sampler," by David J. Ode featuring plants that may be found in Montana as well as South Dakota: Ipomoea leptophylla, Monarda fistulosa, and Buchloe dactyloides; Rachel Potter announces a "Whitebark Pine Management Conference" in Whitefish to be held September 16 – 18 with a link to www.whitebarkfound.org for more information and to register; and Society news and events.

V 29 3, Spring 2016. Peter Lesica opens this issue with "Focus on Genetics," a report on the 2016 Plant Conservation Conference and, "Approved: Two More Important Plant Areas for Montana," announcing the addition of the DutchmanWetlands IPA and the Italian Peaks IPA; all the information you need to know about the 2016 Annual Meeting including schedule and registration information and By-Laws updates for adoption at the meeting; information about candidates for Montana Native Plant Society Officer positions; Betty Kuropat of the Small Grants Commttee describes this year's small grants award projects; in an article reprinted from Yellowstone Dicovery, Beth Pratt-Bergstrom of the National Wildlife Federation discusses, "The Geology of Wildflowers," with particular emphasis on Yellowstone National Park; and plenty of Society news and wise words from our Society President.

V 29 2, Winter 2016. "Ten Thing You Might Not Know About Ferns, But Wish You Did," by Walter Fertig is reprinted from the Sprint 2015 issue of Sego Lily presents a good summary of fern anatomy, reproductive function, and recent learning about genetic relationships among similar groups; Peter Lesica reports on recent work of the Conservation Committee in, "MNPS Continues to Engage ARS on Exotic Plants; Jenny Tollefson reports on her experiment in making syrup from the sap of her backyard Norway Maple in Missoula; Daniel Tinker's review of PONDEROSA: People, Fire, and the West's Most Iconic Tree,by Carl Fiedler and Stephen Arno recomends this treatment of Montana's state tree in an article reprinted from the Castilleja; and plenty of Society and Chapter news and events.

V 29 1, Fall 2015 - "Confessions from a Huckleberry Enthusiast," by Montana Native Plant Society Lifetime Member, Mel Waggy, offers a thorough discussion of a range of interesting issues surrounding the genus Vaccinium; Jon Reny and Jennifer Lyman share "Summer Field Trip Highlights"; Gretchen Rupp tells about a new garden installation in, "MSU Installs New Pollinator Garden"; A notice adapted from an article by Mark Schiltz of the Montana Land Reliance tells about the "Tour of the Cedars" held in June in the Ninemile Valley near Missoula; Tara Carolin and Terry Divoky of the Flathead Chapter of the Montana Native Plant Society report on MNPS awards given this summer to Rachel Potter and Mary and Gary Sloan; and Betty Kuropat reports on the Annual Meeting.

 V 28 4, Summer 2015 – A mid-summer visit to Goat Flat in the Pintlar Mountains is described by Allison DeJong in "Tenacious Beauty: In Awe of Alpine Wildflowers,"; Elizabeth Pansing presents a Small Grant Report on "Germination and first year survival of whitebark pine direct sowing efforts in Glacier National Park and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem"; Frank M. Dugan offers ethnobotanical memories of growing up on the south edge of Missoula in the early fifties in "Palouse Prairie: Synaptic Relics from a Senior Pseudo-Botanist"; and the regular news of the Montana Native Plant Society and comments by our President, Kathy Settevendemie. 

V 28 3, Spring 2015 Steve Shelly discusses some of the unique ecological characteristics of the Swan Valley in, "Botanical Treasures in the Swan Valley: A preview of the MNPS Annual Meeting"; Kathy Settevendemie tells about "Celebrating Peter Stickney" for his many years of dedication to the legacies represented in the UM Herbarium today; Anne Garde describes the 2015 Small Grant Awards made in February; Jennifer Lyman describes management challenges and resource guides available for potential visitors in, "Promoting the Pryors"; In "A Montana Spring Beauty," Kathy Settevendemie describes Arrowleaf Balsamroot – truly a "spring beauty" of a different shape; and plenty of chapter and society news.

V 28 2, Winter 2015 plus Insert Regarding Small Grant Applications. "Wild Mountain Heather," by Dana Visalli reprinted from the Methow Natualist in Washington State discusses plant-fungus symbiosis in a number of plant species as well as some interesting characteristics of several members of the Ericaceae; the "2015 Annual Meeting: For Peat's Sake... Befriend the Fens!" is announced by Marilyn Reynolds, Betty Kuropat, and Chantelle DeLay of the Flathead Chapter; a 2014 Small Grands Report, in "Growing Prgrams at the Fort Missoula Native Plant Garden," Lisa Bickell and Christine Morris relate the success of this garden to the larger mission of the Montana Natural History Center there; in a "Conservation Corner Update," Peter Lesica describes some of the issues around the importation of exotic plants by the USDA; Peter Lesica also tells a lot about the relationships between wild and domestic strawberries in, "Strawberries: More Interesting than Just Jam," Jim Habeck reviews some recent research he did that was made possible by powerful search tools now available as, "UM Herbarium Database Makes Searches Easy," and encourages other researchers to take advantage; and the issue includes an announcement that a new publication, "Montana Lichens: An Annotated List," is now available.

 V 28 1, Fall 2014 – Jenny Tollefson features Toothcup Rotala ramosior, Columbia Water-meal Wolffia columbiana, and Shining Flatsedge Cyperus bipartatus in, "Thriving in an Unlikely Place;" Peter Lesica and Jony Reny present field trip reports on Pyramid Pass, Nurses Lake (part of the annual meeting), and the Annual Exploding Battery hikes; Gretchen Rupp recaps the Annual Meeting at Pine Creek along with Patrick Plantenberg's story about, "Grasses Have Class" and a photo gallery; in the context of a Small Grants Report, two essays by students involved the the Waterworks Hill (Missoula) Weed Control Project discuss their findings; Kathy Lloyd's article, "Rocky Mountain Maple: A Sweet Shrub" is reprinted from a series in Helena's Independent Record and includes more than just Acer glabrum; plus plenty of Chapter news as usual.

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"...to preserve, conserve, and study Montana's native plants
and plant communities."

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"...to preserve, conserve, and study Montana's native plants
and plant communities."
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